Holland America Line

Y5C:10-DAY YUKON+DOUBLE DENALI - LAND & SEA JOURNEY - Cruise First

 
 
Y5C:10-DAY YUKON+DOUBLE DENALI - LAND & SEA JOURNEY - Cruise First
Starting from $1,949*

Vancouver, B.C., CA to Anchorage, Alaska, US


Ship: ms Volendam


Departure Date :

May 29 2019 | Jun 01 2019 | Jun 05 2019 | Jun 08 2019 | Jun 12 2019 | Jun 15 2019 | Jun 19 2019 | Jun 22 2019 | Jun 26 2019 | Jun 29 2019 | Jul 03 2019 | Jul 06 2019 | Jul 10 2019 | Jul 13 2019 | Jul 17 2019 | Jul 20 2019 | Jul 24 2019 | Jul 27 2019 | Jul 31 2019 | Aug 03 2019 | Aug 07 2019 | Aug 10 2019 | Aug 14 2019 | Aug 17 2019 | Aug 21 2019 | Aug 24 2019

Optional tours are available from most ports for an additional charge.

 

Itinerary

 
Day Vancouver, BC, Canada
Sail from Vancouver, glide under the Lion's Gate Bridge, and enter the scenic wonders of the Inside Passage
Vancouver’s location at the mouth of the Fraser River and on the waterways of the Strait of Georgia, Howe Sound, Burrard Inlet and all their tributaries makes this busy seaport an easy place for meeting. It is one of Canada’s most populated, most ethnically diverse cities that is a popular filming location. Visit the interesting neighborhoods of Gastown, Granville Island and Chinatown. Walk across the Capilano Suspension Bridge and stroll through Stanley Park. See the Vancouver Art Gallery and the Museum of Anthropology. There is an amazing variety of things to see and do here.
Vancouver, BC, Canada
 
 
Day At Sea (Inside Passage)
Relax and enjoy a full day of scenic Inside Passage cruising and immerse yourself in Holland America Line elegance
"Alaska’s Inside Passage is a protected network of waterways that wind through glacier-cut fjords and lush temperate rain forests along the rugged coast of Southeast Alaska. Arguably one of the greatest cruising routes in the world, the Inside Passage stretches through stunning landscapes, from Misty Fjords National Monument to famed Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve. Sailing the Inside Passage offers opportunities to spot some of Alaska’s most iconic wildlife, with humpback whales and orca plying the bountiful waters alongside the ships, bald eagles soaring overhead and brown bears lumbering on the shoreline. Numerous ports along the way recount Alaska’s colorful history. In Sitka, an onion-domed church marks Russia’s onetime foothold in the Americas; Ketchikan provides a glimpse of the Native Alaskan experience, with historic totem poles and native-arts galleries; and the legendary town center of Skagway bustles as it did at the turn of the 19th century, when it served as the rowdy Wild West gateway to the Klondike Gold Rush. "
At Sea (Inside Passage)
 
 
Day Tracy Arm Inlet, Alaska, US / Juneau, Alaska, US
This morning you have the chance to explore the stunning beauty of Tracy Arm and the Sawyer Glaciers on an optional excursion / Enjoy the afternoon exploring Alaska's capital. Choose from exciting shore excursions and still have time to shop
Alaska offers unrivaled scenery and adventure among its narrow fjords, rugged mountains and verdant forests. Glaciers loom over the sea like towers of blue ice while migrating whales can be spotted surfacing to exhale jets of spray. And scattered along the coast, remote outposts tell the hardscrabble history of Alaska: Sitka bears traces of the era when Russia ruled these shores, and Ketchikan is studded with the totem poles of Alaska’s native nations. In Skagway, you can walk into a swinging-door saloon, or board the White Pass & Yukon Route Railroad to the legendary Yukon Territory where you can spot wildlife on woodland trails.

Juneau, Alaska, US

Located on the Gastineau Channel in the Alaskan panhandle, Juneau sits at sea level below steep mountains between 3,500-4,000 feet high. Atop these mountains is the Juneau Icefield, a large ice mass from which about 30 glaciers flow, and two of them – Mendenhall Glacier and Lemon Creek Glacier are visible from the local road. A unique feature of Juneau is that it is the only U.S. capital that has no roads connecting it to the rest of the state.
Tracy Arm Inlet, Alaska, US / Juneau, Alaska, US
 
 
Day Whitehorse
Meet your Journey Host in Skagway before departing aboard the historic White Pass train to Fraser, then on to Whitehorse via Explorer coach
"Northern Canada’s largest city sprang from frontier roots. During the Klondike Gold Rush, prospectors washed up here, past two major river obstacles: Miles Canyon and the Whitehorse Rapids (named for whitecapped waves that resembled stallions’ manes). To prevent mass starvation, the government required every Stampeder to haul along a year’s supply of goods. The recommended list included 10 pounds of coffee, 150 pounds of bacon and 400 pounds of flour—part of a total 1,095 pounds of grub. Sundries like picks, ropes and a dozen heavy wool socks quickly brought the load up to a ton. Whitehorse, the northern terminus of the railway from Skagway, Alaska, boomed because it was as far north as would-be miners and their freight could travel by train; from here, sternwheelers did the rest, 740 kilometers (460 miles) down the upper Yukon River to the mining town of Dawson City. Now the territory’s capital, Whitehorse stands at Historic Mile 918 of the Alaska Highway and has the world’s lowest level of metropolitan air pollution, according to Guinness World Records 2013. It remains a popular tourist stop for attractions like the Yukon Wildlife Preserve; the Frantic Follies, a fin de siècle vaudeville revue; and the natural and cultural insights at the MacBride Museum. "
Whitehorse
 
 
Day Dawson City
Follow the route of Klondike gold stampeders in style to Dawson City, with an included lunch stop in historic Minto
"Old-time wooden boardwalks connect frontier-era buildings in the Yukon Territory’s original capital. The heart of the Klondike Gold Rush, Dawson City housed around 30,000 people in the summer of 1898. But the town was sliding towards “ghost” status just a year later: A fire had destroyed 117 structures, right as the gold ran out and rumors arrived of nuggets in Nome, Alaska. Dawson City moseyed along quietly until the early 1960s, when Parks Canada began refurbishing landmarks like the Palace Grand Theatre (1899) and the Commissioner’s Residence (1901). It also resurrected the sternwheeler ss Keno and North America’s largest wooden-hull, bucket-line dredge. Along with the community of Bonanza Creek—where Stampeders pried $500 million in gold from the frozen ground—these icons form the Klondike National Historic Sites, now part of a larger proposed UNESCO World Heritage area. Today tourists wander this subarctic hotspot, which has retained its 19th-century charm. Highlights include the Jack London Museum, Diamond Tooth Gerties Gambling Hall and the Sourdough Saloon, which infamously serves a cocktail containing a preserved human toe (donated!). "
Dawson City
 
 
Day Fairbanks
Your journey continues as you board a short flight bound for Fairbanks, Alaska's Golden Heart City
"Bearing the nickname the Golden Heart, Alaska’s second-largest city was born of gold rush fever, thanks to Italian immigrant Felix Pedro who found the precious metal in 1902 near where Captain E.T. Barnette decided to build a trading post on the banks of the Chena River. Though much of Fairbanks today is an amalgam of modern shops and malls, its history is celebrated at the 18-hectare (44-acre) Pioneer Park, which includes a Gold Rush Town with 35 restored buildings. Fairbanks also preserved its City Hall, which now houses the Fairbanks Community Museum. The city’s location in Alaska’s interior makes it a gateway to the arctic, and in summer tourist boats run cruises along the Chena and Tanana rivers. Fairbanks is a city of festivals, from July’s Golden Days commemorating its past, to Ice Alaska in February and March, when residents make the best of its brutal winters by playing host to a slew of international ice sculptors who descend on the city for the World Ice Art Championships. The city is one of the best places in the world to see the aurora borealis, which appears on average 243 nights of the year. For more insight into Fairbanks, the Morris Thompson Cultural & Visitors Center is a good place to start. "
Fairbanks
 
 
Day Denali National Park
Today it's off to Denali for a two night stay at this magnificent national treasure
"Almost as large as the state of Massachusetts, Denali National Park is the first and last stop on any adventure into Alaska’s wild. At some 24,500 square kilometers (or 6 million acres) including the surrounding preserve, it is the third-largest national park in the United States, after two other Alaska parks: Wrangell-St. Elias and the Gates of the Arctic. The park offers excellent chances for seeing wildlife, including moose, wolves, caribou, Dall sheep and grizzly bears. Presiding over it is the tallest peak in North America, Denali (formerly Mount McKinley), which means “the tall one” in a name derived from Koyukon, a language traditionally spoken by the Athabascan people of Alaska. The soaring mountain divides the park into north and south sides. The south side is most popular with mountain climbers and those on flightseeing tours, while the north is where the bulk of visitors go, traveling along Park Road, which winds for 148 kilometers (92 miles) through Denali National Park. Visitors can sightsee the entire way via the green Visitor Transportation System shuttle buses, which stop at various hiking trails. The mighty mountain is actually not visible from the entrance of the park that bears its name; some of the best vantage points from which to see it are between miles 9 and 11 on Park Road. Other notable sites include the Husky Homestead, an Iditarod-training center for husky sled dogs, while the kid-friendly Murie Science and Learning Center showcases a fossilized footprint of a three-toed Cretaceous-era theropod dinosaur, found in the park in 2005. "
Denali National Park
 
 
Day Denali National Park
Today features the unforgettable Tundra Wilderness Tour. This 6-8 hour fully narrated sightseeing excursion is a deep dive into Denali National Park the very best chance of seeing both the mountain itself and Denali's iconic wildlife (snack included)
"Almost as large as the state of Massachusetts, Denali National Park is the first and last stop on any adventure into Alaska’s wild. At some 24,500 square kilometers (or 6 million acres) including the surrounding preserve, it is the third-largest national park in the United States, after two other Alaska parks: Wrangell-St. Elias and the Gates of the Arctic. The park offers excellent chances for seeing wildlife, including moose, wolves, caribou, Dall sheep and grizzly bears. Presiding over it is the tallest peak in North America, Denali (formerly Mount McKinley), which means “the tall one” in a name derived from Koyukon, a language traditionally spoken by the Athabascan people of Alaska. The soaring mountain divides the park into north and south sides. The south side is most popular with mountain climbers and those on flightseeing tours, while the north is where the bulk of visitors go, traveling along Park Road, which winds for 148 kilometers (92 miles) through Denali National Park. Visitors can sightsee the entire way via the green Visitor Transportation System shuttle buses, which stop at various hiking trails. The mighty mountain is actually not visible from the entrance of the park that bears its name; some of the best vantage points from which to see it are between miles 9 and 11 on Park Road. Other notable sites include the Husky Homestead, an Iditarod-training center for husky sled dogs, while the kid-friendly Murie Science and Learning Center showcases a fossilized footprint of a three-toed Cretaceous-era theropod dinosaur, found in the park in 2005. "
Denali National Park
 
 
Day Anchorage, Alaska, US
This morning, board the luxurious domed rail cars of the McKinley Explorer bound for Anchorage where you will bid farewell to your Journey Host
After long and dark winters, Alaskans love their summers and the residents of Anchorage, Alaska are no exception. The city plants thousands of flowers to celebrate the arrival of warmer months and days that last as long as 19 hours from dawn to dusk.

Approximately 40 percent of Alaska’s population lives in Anchorage. This diverse city of 300,000 includes a large military population, Native Alaskans, individuals who work for the oil industry and adventure-seeking types who want to get away from “the Lower 48.” Much like Seattle, Anchorage is a place where you can find a coffee shop (or espresso shack) anywhere. Locals enjoy skijoring, a winter sport where a person is pulled on skis by one or more dogs or sometimes a horse. While some cities have deer, Anchorage has lots of moose, known for being a bit rambunctious (and should be steered clear of if seen wandering down a street).
Anchorage, Alaska, US
 
 
Day Anchorage, Alaska, US
Your Land + Sea Journey concludes this morning in Anchorage
After long and dark winters, Alaskans love their summers and the residents of Anchorage, Alaska are no exception. The city plants thousands of flowers to celebrate the arrival of warmer months and days that last as long as 19 hours from dawn to dusk.

Approximately 40 percent of Alaska’s population lives in Anchorage. This diverse city of 300,000 includes a large military population, Native Alaskans, individuals who work for the oil industry and adventure-seeking types who want to get away from “the Lower 48.” Much like Seattle, Anchorage is a place where you can find a coffee shop (or espresso shack) anywhere. Locals enjoy skijoring, a winter sport where a person is pulled on skis by one or more dogs or sometimes a horse. While some cities have deer, Anchorage has lots of moose, known for being a bit rambunctious (and should be steered clear of if seen wandering down a street).
Anchorage, Alaska, US
 
 
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